Fundamentals of Lighting

This course is a part of the

Introduction to Blender

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  • 149 lessons
  • 12hrs 21min
  • 8 exercises
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Fundamentals of Lighting

Without light nothing can be seen, thus it is extremely important. And beyond the basic requirement for sight, lighting is equally, if not more important for appeal.

After you know the basics of how to illuminate, the next step for a lighting artist is developing attractive illumination. The baseline light setup is called “3 Point Lighting”. The application chapter covers this as well as how to illuminate your scene entirely with a single HDRi environment texture.

Chapter 1 - Lighting for Cycles

Cycles is Blender's latest and greatest physically-based render engine.

Chapter 2 - Types of Illumination (Cycles)

There are several ways of illuminating your 3D scene. These include "Lamp" object types, emitting light from mesh objects, and environment illumination with a "World" texture.

Chapter 3 - Application (Cycles)

It's one thing to know how to introduce light into your scene and another to make illumination appealing. This chapter covers a standard 3-point light setup along with HDRi illumination.

Chapter 4 - Quiz (Cycles)

Fancy a knowledge test? Go ahead. I dare you.

Chapter 5 - Exercise

In applying what you've learned, the challenge here is to light a pre-made bedroom scene once for day time and once for night time.

Without light nothing can be seen. Thus it is extremely important. And beyond the basic requirement for sight, lighting is equally, if not more important for appeal.

To be a competent and/or skilled 3D artist, you need to understand first how you can introduce illumination into your scene. This can be accomplished with lamp objects like Spot lamps, Sun lamps, Area lamps, etc. You can also assign an emissive material to non-lamp objects so they illuminate as a light source. Lastly you can illuminate your scene with the World environment. Each of these are explained in the “Types of Illumination” chapter.

After you know the basics of how to illuminate, the next step for a lighting artist is developing appealing illumination. The baseline light setup is called “3 Point Lighting”. The “Application” chapter covers this as well as how to illuminate your scene entirely with a single HDRi environment texture.

CC Music: “Outer Planet” by Robbero

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  • Replies: 1

    At the end of this course, we are told to download the project files and set up the scene for lighting during the day and at night. In the video this scene is a bedroom. However when I download the project files and load them up in blender. I get the scene with the gizmo torus and cube.
    If this is now scene you want us to light I guess I use the 3 point light method?

    1 year ago

  • Replies: 1

    I’m am getting way more noise than you seem to be in each of these tutorial videos. Especially at the end of the Rim lighting video, the shaderGizmo has a LOT of noise at the top. Was there some major change in default settings in Blender 2.76?

    1 year ago

  • Replies: 2

    Hi there, I am in the middle of rendering my night time scene. Which is going to take 2 hours! The daytime scene took me almost that long as well. I am wondering if maybe I have some bad settings. I am really new to blender, so I am not sure about render settings. Here is my user system settings, and render settings. https://gyazo.com/74a26c414d95d40d5faeff72605b9c40. My computer is 2 years old, but I thought it was pretty good still. I have i7-4770 K, 32g ram and Geforce Gtx 980 GPU.
    Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks you.

    1 year ago

    • Replies: 3

      1 year ago

      • Thanks for the link Kent! I, probably like most people, found this course through “Introduction to Blender”. As this is only my second course here, it would have taken my a while to find that.

        1 year ago

      • Kent, may i suggest that if fundamentals of rendering is important for this course, that you mention it as a prerequisite in the “Fundamentals of Blender” course flow?

        1 year ago

        • I appreciate the suggestion! I can see where you’re coming from. But it’s only important if you want to get rid of fireflies and noise, right? Which only happens after lighting is established, which is why the rendering course after the lighting course…Also lighting happens before rendering in a production pipeline. Really they both go hand-in-hand. Lol it’s tough choosing a linear curriculum progression for complimentary subjects ;P

          However there is a pretty large gap between the lighting and rendering courses, with other courses in between. Maybe it will help to move lighting to immediately before rendering.

          Anyhoo, you present a good thought – Thanks again!

          1 year ago

      • No not yet, I am taking the flow in order, but I will get to that for sure. Being really new to blender and CG both, its a steep learning curve. Thanks for the classes I am learning a lot, even if I have to watch some videos 2 or 3 times before it sinks in.

        1 year ago

    • Replies: 1

      I have pretty much the same build as you except for I have a GTX970 (which for CUDA processing isn’t really that much different). My final render took 1:34 for the daytime scene.

      I will say, I did find it helpful as I was refining the lighting to do renders at 50-100 samples, which usually finished in around 5 minutes and gave me a pretty good idea of the shadows, colors, and intensity.

      1 year ago

      • Thanks for the info, I was investigating CG rigs and saw how really inadequate my pc is for it, and I thought I had a good pc lol. I will have to take more courses to learn more about the rendering process. Thanks again.

        1 year ago

  • Replies: 0

    Hi @jonathan_l, When I open blender and set up the default standard scene with a cube and add two lamps, they do not emit light onto my objects, no matter which lamp I choose (i.e. spot, sun, area etc..).

    I have set the lamp setting to the standard one of “emission” and I have tried increasing the strength of the light or bringing it closer to my object etc.

    When I open the course tutorial files however, the lighting all works fine without an issue. Am I missing something? Or is there something which I have done wrong? I haven’t added any backgrounds or scenery or anything. Just the plain old cube with 2 lamps and a camera to render. I would appreciate a pointer in the right direction please. Thank you!

    Note: I’m in cycles blender mode and trying to create a shiny gold cube.

    1 year ago

  • Replies: 0

    Hi @jonathan_l, When I open blender and set up the default standard scene with a cube and add two lamps, they do not emit light onto my objects, no matter which lamp I choose (i.e. spot, sun, area etc..).

    I have set the lamp setting to the standard one of “emission” and I have tried increasing the strength of the light or bringing it closer to my object etc.

    When I open the course tutorial files however, the lighting all works fine without an issue. Am I missing something? Or is there something which I have done wrong? I haven’t added any backgrounds or scenery or anything. Just the plain old cube with 2 lamps and a camera to render. I would appreciate a pointer in the right direction please. Thank you!

    1 year ago

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