crew
Adrian Bellworthy (adrian2301)

134 replies · posted

Backhoe Contribution - adrian2301 - Chassis/Stabilizer/Fenders and the Engine. And the hydraulics for the swing frame.

This is the thread for my progress on the Backhoe Collaboration.

Ask me questions, give suggestions and post some images that may help my progress.

Thanks

  • crew

    • crew

      THAT. IS. GORGEOUS.

    • crew

      Seeing this reminded me to adjust my hydraulic lines. But I can't make any progress because I keep STARING AT YOUR SWING FRAME UPDATE

    • crew

      I think your lines maybe slightly bigger than mine. The depth on the bevel for the curve I used is 0.5", which is radius , as blanchsb 's knowledge he shared. Cant remember what you used but I think adjusting the size of the joint, nut, union, not sure what it's called, where yours meet mine might be the best option. I have increased the diameter of the centre as much as possible without increasing the size as a whole, but I could If needs be.

      Also I noticed the way your lines come from the loader arm where the turn towards the swing frame , the best location for each to avoid collisions would be the outer line to bottom connector, outer to inner line - bottom to top connector on each side. Does that make sense, not sure it does. The two outer lines to the two bottom hoses , next two lines from the outside to the next connector up, and so on. OK I'm sure you are smarter than me and know what your doing. 

    • adrian2301 dude, that is outstanding!  Really, I can't stop staring.  I wish I had access to the 3D model so I could have a look all the way around.  


      I've been so nervous that this part might be left unfinished because of me, but those fears are completely gone now.  Thank you so much for taking up my slack!

    • crew

      Thanks jjakeblended , just continuing your good work.

      Some more shots for you.

    • crew

      I connected my lines easy enough:

      Our minds must have been telepathically linked because I took the exact approach you described! Also had to decrease the cables end control point to 0.9 radius. No one will ever know ..

    • Now just for the sake of theory - how would one go about rigging this for animation?  Of course the hoses are folded into those very large "wings" to allow the slide part of the swing frame to, well, slide from side-to-side across the back of the chassis.  I'm trying to figure out how a rigger might set up those hoses to deform properly and it's just not coming to me.

      Kent's lines, leading out through the back of the swing frame, would be easy enough with like a simple deform modifier or a lattice I should think.  To save time, perhaps Wayne might decide to only rig the swinging capability of this part and not the lateral-sliding capability - after all, I've looked high and low and never once been able to find an actual video of the thing sliding.

    • crew

      I'm sure the master animator waylow will have a trick or two.

    • crew

      Yeah, I know a few tricks, but they always depend on the circumstances.

      If all those cables are curves (and not geo), it will be easier to rig the curves with hooks to some bones.


      If it's a cable or something that an animator won't need to animate, you just need to figure out a way to make it behave w/o the animator needing to touch it.  So the solution could be really simple,...or super complicated haha.

  • Dat rait der is a ting of B.U.T.!

  • crew

    Today's progress: 

    The cable and assembly for the boom lock hook:


    and the swing lock and holder:


  • crew

    Drilled some holes and added the Zerk fittings, (grease fittings, to us earthlings).

    And I think we are done with the swing frame assembly.


    • Looks really beautifull! I enjoy seeing all these details like the grease fittings 👍!

    • Adrian you have done a fabulous job!

    • crew
      You absolutely crushed it adrian2301. A stunning way to complete what jjakeblended started! Seriously this is a piece of hardsurface modeling heaven.
    • crew

      Thank you theluthier . This collaboration has been a blessing for me to really focus on my modeling skills, with not having to go to work from March until December, (and possibly another 6 months after that, but I will decide that when the time comes, and if the DOG is done by then). It has also given me the believe that maybe I could do this for real, like as a career. Do you think I am at that stage yet? And where do I start? I thought Blender Market would be good place to start  with some extra pennies.

    • Tremendous work, adrian2301 !  

      I'm right there with you.  I'm in the middle of a momentary hardware setback right now; but I'm hyped for the future.  I've always been kind of hoping to turn what I'm learning into a marketable skill since the beginning, but I was also worried for the longest time that that might be a pipe-dream, that I might get "good" but not really good "enough" that anyone would be willing to pay for something I made.  However, the last couple of projects I've worked on with you guys have convinced me that it's a realistic goal.  I don't know if I'm quite there yet, but I definitely think it's within reach.  And I definitely think it's within your reach too, if you're not there already.

    • crew

      adrian2301 jjakeblended There isn't a magical moment where you know your skills are professional-quality. The primary realization comes when you first land a professional gig, complete it, and get paid for it. That's when you know you know. Secondarily it helps to hear a career 3D artist tell you have what it takes. So hear it from me:

      You BOTH have pro-level modeling skills. I know you could succeed in a studio context, a freelance context, or a passive-income context. The piece of the puzzle to make it happen has less to do with your technical skills and more to do with standing out in the crowd; being noticed.

      These days 3D modelers are a dime a dozen which means high-caliber skills is just a foot in the door. You can check that one off your list. Next on the list is gaining an audience with the internet and thus a studio's attention and/or clientele.

      Take Luis Burdallo for example. According to linkedin he's been doing freelance audio equipment renders professional for more than 10 years. There is absolutely nothing ground-breaking about his modeling. It's just good and accurate. Easily you and other DOG POUNDERS can model same as him. But it's the presentation that catches my eye and makes me hit the follow button. And I guarantee it's the presentation that has fueled his decade-long career.

      Similarly Karol Miklas is an established vehicle modeler. You can definitely model vehicles like his. But it's his presentation that stands out and no-doubt has earned him a successful career.

      If you really want to pursue a career in computer graphics, it's valuable to decide on a specific avenue. I'll mention 3 main avenues: 

      1. Passive income through 3D modeling is super intriguing to me and involves the least risk. Blender Market, Gumroad, Second Life, etc. This video from JL Mussi turned me on to the potential of this:

      2. The freelance avenue is arguably the most dependent on standing out in the crowd that is the internet. For someone with no professional connections and only their portfolio to showcase their skills, you can imagine how important standing out is.

      I've often daydreamed about a full-time freelance career but personally am intimidated by the uncertainty of work drying up. However I dabble fairly regularly in part-time freelancing as supplemental income. 90% of all my freelance work has come from professional connections.

      3. The studio avenue is the most traditional context imo: Working at a building with a team of co-workers, consistent paychecks, insurance, etc. In many ways this offers the most job security (though cg studios aren't that secure compared to other industries but that's another discussion). Landing a job at a studio is a little weird in that it's usually a mixture of standing out and/or benefiting from a recommendation. I didn't have any connections upon graduating from college and leaned 100% on my portfolio standing out and landing a studio gig. But a lot of my co-workers didn't have stunner portfolios and earned positions through networking or resume.

      I fear I'm rambling a bit at this point...hopefully there's something in this wall of text to chew on. I really should distill these thoughts into an organized livestream and/or article.

    • crew

      Wow!! Thank you!! , Thank you for the positive feed back, it means so much coming from a real modelling legend such as you theluthier . And thank you for taking the time to respond with such an in depth reply, It's extremely useful information and food for thought on the next step. By no means are you rambling, you could go on for another 30 minutes and you would still have my attention. When you finish your live streams short, ha ha ha,  at 2 1/2 to 3 hours , as you have a couple of times recently, I could watch and listen another 3 hours, because everything you teach us is relevant, informative and valuable, with a spot of humour thrown in for free. Thank you again...... for everything.

    • crew

      I could watch and listen another 3 hours, because everything you teach us is relevant, informative and valuable, with a spot of humour thrown in for free.

      You may not know how much this means for me to read! One of my biggest fears is speaking to a group of people about something that doesn't interest them. Much more to do it for an extended period  of time! This feedback helps a lot. Thanks :)

    • crew

      I think feedback is important for everyone. But I can only imagine what it's like, on a live stream, when everyone can see you but you can't see them, you have no idea if anyone is even interested, especially when the chat is off topic. 

    • Yeah I don't know how Kent manages the livestreams, as if tutorials aren't hard enough. I would just freeze and words wouldn't come out of my mouth if I had a camera pointed at me and there is supposed to be people there that I don't see.

      You know what I think is also important in work that is for real... when we are doing the DOG or working on our own stuff, we do it because we feel like it and we do it at our own rhythm and pace. But when is client work, there is this frustrating lack of authority or control, it's not your timing or pacing, you develop this insecurity because they always say "oh is a ten second animation" or "oh is just one simple model" only to have that initial request turn on its head and the job suddenly becomes a 3 minutes animation and there's dozens of models and "oh you remember we said it was due in one month? yeah need it finished in 3 days now."

      So a capacity to adapt is super important and also handling frustrations, and a lot of times your modeling ability takes the passenger seat and the job depends not on how good, but on how fast can you model good enough (Like Kent always says). In other words you can model something amazing, but if you can only do it at your own pacing and it takes you 2 months, then maybe that isn't enough for the real world, crazy under stress, much faster circumstances and lack of control, money driven client work. I really hate that by the way, every time freelance work comes by me I always have to sigh, take a deep breath and try not to listen to the excuses my brain comes up with, because I never want to take it. But I always do and after an intense period of hating what I'm going through, in the end most of the time it's worth it.

      Disclaimer though, that is probably my perception on the whole thing, perhaps lots of people don't have that experience and they love it. I wouldn't know because I don't know anyone in real life that does 3D or freelance. 

    • crew

      dostovel I've definitely had my share of lame / draining freelance gigs. Everything you've said from sudden shifts in job parameters, rapidly shortened deadlines, and even slow payments (from a previously reliable client at that). I would never say it's an easy thing to get into and be successful. BUT now that I'm years into it generating some extra spending cash, I end up grateful that my skills make it an option for me.

      I think navigating freelance positively is a matter of weathering the initial storm of questionable / bad clients. After the first year an artist knows how to go about freelance (pricing themselves, negotiating, standing their ground, communicating with clients, delivering results) and SHOULD have found few *good* clients along the way. That handful of good clients I keep working with year after year and occasionally pick up a new client if the job (pay) is good enough. In fact it's common that my good clients refer me to other good clients. The power of networking is real.

      It's not for everyone though. My brother did a couple freelance jobs earlier in his career and he hated it; never tried again.

    • theluthier  Yes to networking, it's the only thing that has ever worked for me and I didn't even seek it out. When I was learning Blender on CG Cookie lots of years ago, a friend convinced me to do some work since see had seen my progress and he was sure I could do that job. I freaked out, I told him no, that's a bad idea, I don't know if I could do it for real, I'm just having fun playing around with the software, but he pressed on and convinced me to do the job. It was some archviz of a hospital that was being constructed. After that was done, that job led directly to another, those people referred to me to other people, then some other friend saw the freelance work I had done and offered me other freelance work and those people referred to me to other people and so on and so forth. 

      It was just a snow ball effect, and each and every one of those jobs were a nervous freakout, but saying yes to all of that when my brain kept saying no, allowed me to fully pay my house loan with the bank, debt free, and freelance gigs was at least 55% of the reason I was able to do that. Also at the beginning I almost didn't learn Blender, because there wasn't any good tutorials out there, explanations were so bad in sites like Lynda and in the beginning when the learning curve is the hardest it's easy to just loose motivation, so I was like meh. But then I found CG Cookie and my interest was rekindled when I saw Jonathan Williamson and Kent's tutorials, so I was like uhumm, here it is, now I'm beginning to learn something. 

      Anyways, since every single freelance work I've ever taken I have endured it more than enjoy it, I've often wonder if maybe is it that I don't like this work, I mean I do it, the whole 3D pipeline is so much fun when I'm doing stuff for myself, but when it comes to actual work, I've never seen people describe the work as something to do because it's work and you get payed and you need to make a living, you know the normal stuff....but people talk about the work as god sent, oh my god I love this! my dream job! you have to work work work 24/7, I give my soul to the studio, here studio! take my life!, I'm sooo passionate, I'm not being exploited because I love it. So I'm always left wondering if people do that only on social media because that's what social media does, you sell you life as amazing but no one ever sees your behind the scenes.

      So is it me? Does everyone genuinely enjoys it or are people really just pompous on social media? I've worked on a couple of movies and TV shows here and they were the worst experiences ever. Production people are scumbags, jesus christ, every single time everyone's ego was extremely bloated and the pressure is enormous one everyone, they exploit you to unnecessary lengths, and yet you put on YouTube and I see everyone that works on "The Industry" telling similar tales but they justify it, they say is the way it is and they love it and they wouldn't have it any other way, that you are just lazy if you don't tolerate how the job is. I don't get it, how are they not protesting? Most people must be wearing themselves out to such unhealthy lengths. Yet I'm going to try it out, I'll look for a job and see what happens. I hope the experience will be ok because it would be really bad to find out late in life that what you do for a living isn't what you actually like. But I guess that happens to like 90% of the world population.

    • crew

      but people talk about the work as god sent, oh my god I love this! my dream job! you have to work work work 24/7, I give my soul to the studio, here studio! take my life!, I'm sooo passionate, I'm not being exploited because I love it.

      This is a major misconception within CG imo. For so long it's been seen as a "how lucky am I to do CG for a living" - by the artists themselves as well as studios / clients imo - which has led to an imbalanced industry, underpaid artists for amazing work that's in extremely high demand. That just doesn't makes sense.

      There's many facets to the discussion but specifically about being lucky to do CG is true but can be, and is, dangerously misunderstood. I certainly feel lucky to have made this my profession. But that gratitude is not compensation and thus NOT a reason to accept low rates or accept long hours, unpaid overtime, or ridiculous deadlines. But we see those things happen all the time in the industry. Personally I think the artists are to blame as much as clients / studios. We're the ones who started accepting the bad deals our of misguided gratitude for doing what we love professionally. As far as I can tell artists in the industry need to unify (unionize probably), stnad their ground and set things right or the industry will always have these problems.

      Apart from that is the personal attitude each artists feel toward professional CG work. I've always said that my main motivation to join CGC and teach Blender full time was that it allows me to create what I want. This remains 90% true but I've also had to teach topics I wasn't interested in. And despite it being CG-related, it might as well have been bagging groceries or busing tables at a restaurant. "Not that there's anything wrong with that!" -Seinfeld

      Meaning that the tedious monotony of every job every performed by human being is very possible to CG jobs. In fact you can count on it as an absolute. If people on social media make it sound like it's 100% euphoric to turn their passion into their career, understand that's just how they feel in the moment. Every pro has those moments where a model turned out just right or their project earned top row on artstation or the TV show they worked on won an emmy. So many jobs don't have the potential for such moments of deep personal reward - THAT's what makes me grateful CG is my career despite tons of unsatisfying just-a-job moments. Even when I think "in another life I would have pursued [insert hobby] as a career" I inevitably step back and remember the rewarding moments.

      That said I don't doubt that people try CG and don't feel the same reward. Of course it's not for everyone. But dostovel for as long as I've watched your CG journey couple with the quality of your skills...I can't imagine you being one of those people. You have what it takes to be a pro and have rewarding moments that outweigh the monotonous ones. So personally I'm not convinced of this:

      I've often wonder if maybe is it that I don't like this work,

      Honestly I sense that you're believing a myth: It's possible to 100% love your job day after day. This cannot be true and thus comes down to "which job can I have more rewarding moments than disappointing moments?" CG is that for me and I truly think it could - will - be that for you.

    • crew

      All work has it's pro's and con's in my experience, but I haven't worked in CG yet!!. I read comments like this and I am more inclined to go towards the passive income route, at least to begin with, and then maybe get requests for specific models and freelance once I'm out there. 

      Does everyone genuinely enjoys it or are people really just pompous on social media?

      Probably a mix of both. Social media is about getting noticed and potential work, so some people will post anything relating to CG just for that reason, but a positive post will attract the right response, we hope. I think some people can handle the difficult clients better than others, probably through experience and take the rough with the smooth. You you will always find those people, in any job, that will try and take advantage of others. 

      So the morale of this story would be:

      "Try and keep the roughness less than 0.5, and bump up the glossy". ©2020 adrian2301 

      I appreciate you sharing your thoughts, the positive and the negative, It all helps with the awareness of potential issues.

      For the record, I agree with theluthier , Iv'e seen your demo reel dostovel , and other work you have posted on CGC, and you never fail to impress. 

    • theluthier  this topic has been so informative. You should do an article on this for everyone! Including what adrian2301  and dostovel have said.

    • crew

      "Try and keep the roughness less than 0.5, and bump up the glossy".  -©2020 adrian2301

      Haha brilliantly stated. We Blender nerds felt that in our souls 🎯

      ketre I definitely need to "officialize" what's being discussed. Wayne Dixon has been mentioning another freelance / career oriented livestream discussion for a while. If not that then an article..maybe start with an AMA on the forum and turn the answers into an organized article. Something will come about!

    • theluthier  uhhh question would you ever get said what you needed with all the questions we'd ask?  😝 lol that sounds like a good plan!

    • crew

      theluthier , on from what ketre said in regards to a topic for an article, quite a long way on if I'm honest, have you or CGC as a whole ever considered a small production piece as a showcase for CGC. There is so much talent on here, I was wondering if it had ever been thought of. Maybe a CGC Online Studio could develop , for promotional pieces. A bit like the backhoe collaboration, but bigger, much bigger. The likes of yourself, jlampel and waylow could pick people to do certain tasks and over see it rather than be completely involved as I can imagine you are all busy with all the other stuff you do. So you would oversee a team of modellers, jlampel would oversee the texturing, shading and lighting team, and waylow  would oversee the animation team. I heard wesburke is a master at sound effects. There are probably more people at CGC that could be involved, but you get the idea. And of course there would be some MoLE 's to help out.

      You could all even ask for a pay rise.

    • I'd love that!!! I'm sure they could find something small and SIMPLE for me haha

    • crew

      adrian2301 I think I'm picking up what you're throwing down. It sounds like a pipe-dream I have about what the backhoe project represents as a learning format: Basically real-world production experience as a team.

       bit like the backhoe collaboration, but bigger, much bigger.

      Umm...I don't know about you but this backhoe project has been pretty huge in my book 😅 Huge in the sense of manhours but not so huge in terms of project scope. But lets say every year CGC hosts a collaborative project (or twice a year depending on scope). The goal is always the same: Realworld collaboration to accomplish a big project together. Sometimes the focus is a super complex model, like the backhoe, the next one is a 5-minute stylized cartoony animation, then its a playable video game production...on an on it goes. 

      Contributors get realworld experience, something really cool to show for it in the end (usable on a demo reel), and CGC also benefits from the cool thing we create (promotion, our own creative itches scratched). If a bunch of contributors committed we could even separate into teams with one led by me, one by Lampel, one by Wayne. Introduce some friendly competition perhaps. Or as you say, each team focuses on a certain aspect of the production like pipeline departments. The beauty is the details of each collaboration could be flexible an interesting.

      Internally we've always emphasized a desire to foster passion projects. A few times we've started them with the idea to generate tutorials but most of them fizzle out due to us being such a small team. The latest example is an FPS project from a few years ago. I kinda see this collaborative concpet with members being an evolution of that idea.

      You could all even ask for a pay rise.

      I don't quite understand what you mean here..unless you mean this "CGC Online Studio" is a for-hire professional studio of sorts, doing paid work. That's not what I mean but rather the collaborations would be a value-add to the membership.

    • crew

      The issue with such huge projects is commitment, it would be hard for CGC members to be 100% committed. We have seen with the Backhoe people have real life issues to contend with. If not for these issues I would of expected the DOG done by now, or at least in the hands of waylow for animating.

      I think most people dream of making a game or animated movie when they begin learning 3D, including me, and then the reality kicks in and you realise how much work is involved and you will unlikely get very far on your own.

      Wouldn't it be great if dreams came true....

      Seeing the DOG evolve and turn into a thing of beauty with everyone's hard work is motivation enough for me, but I don't need to go to work at the moment and have the time. If I did then money wins the motivational battle. I will have to go back to work at some point next year, then a project like the DOG would be hard to commit to.

      theluthier ,What I meant by "you could all ask for a pay rise" was the cookie crew getting paid more for their efforts.

    • Thanks for taking the time to write a great answer Kent. You are right of course, it's myths and bloated perceptions all around. I've only worked as a graphic designer in a single place for 13 years, and that place isn't even art related, it's a bank, but in this country if you have an ok job you better not complain, because you are luckier than most. So I only have that place to draw an image in my head of what a workplace is like and as workplaces go, that hasn't always been good.

      When people that think in terms of excel spreadsheets and quarterly numbers, suits,  ties and briefcases are the ones who call the shots on art, well, you go through all the cliches: making something that works and looks good only to have it subverted over and over again, changes and changes and endless changes  that don't makes sense and yet you end up at the beginning after all the wasted time and energy; trying to move approvals up the chain of command only to have things returned for more senseless requests, awesome things get rejected, ugly things get approved, vague descriptions of what they want, why bother making something cool if it's going to get morphed beyond recognition into something worst every single time  and oh so many etc's etc's. After many many years it takes a huge toll and you think, dude is it possible to work on something devoted of opinions? where when it's done it's done the first time and no one has to toss their perception into the mix that cause it to be reset from square one?

      So you figure well, this is the only thing I have ever known, I can't be like this in places where everyone is art competent can it? and yeah based on what I have seen here in advert agencies it is actually better, but most of the same predicaments are ever present, from what I can tell it's the nature of the beast when you work in the creative fields. You see it all over the internet, no matter the country. Things are never finished, only abandoned, and to try and get them at a place where they work, many and many iterations are unavoidable. I think where I'm trying to get at is that... that natural process inherent in creativity, I personally now associate it to pain, discomfort, weariness, exhaustion and relate it to the worst and never ending practices of my workplace. I've now realized as I write this, it must be some sort of PTSD... holy hell, this is amazing, sitting here typing I think I've unlocked where that unease comes from. I think I'm gonna go eat pineapple now, I think I've figured it out. 

    • This definitely is a charged topic. That's why I come to CGCookie to get my PTSD some much needed nurture time. Your words are similar in most industries of big business.

    • Umm...I don't know about you but this backhoe project has been pretty huge in my book 😅 Huge in the sense of manhours but not so huge in terms of project scope. But lets say every year CGC hosts a collaborative project (or twice a year depending on scope). The goal is always the same: Realworld collaboration to accomplish a big project together. Sometimes the focus is a super complex model, like the backhoe, the next one is a 5-minute stylized cartoony animation, then its a playable video game production...on an on it goes.  

      This sounds first-rate to me, if it can be done while still leaving you guys headroom for continuing to make your awesome courses and other lessons - those are the bread and butter of CGC after all!  But I really enjoyed working on the DOG and I'd love to do another project when it's finished.  

      One unfortunate aspect of the DOG project is that it did seem to lock out some of the more beginner-level and even some intermediate-level members.  I'm pretty sure you mentioned at the beginning when announcing the project that it was going to be for more-advanced members; but that didn't stop some less-advanced users from trying, and it was unfun to watch them struggle and end up going silent.  It seems to me though that it would be a serious challenge trying to find a project as complex as the DOG in which beginners can meaningfully participate.  Perhaps along with the super-complex stuff, it would be good to come up with some simpler projects as well for newer artists.  Or the "live classes" you guys have been doing can fill this need, as many of those seemed to fill it quite well so far. 

      Speaking of courses though - yeah I am SERIOUSLY looking forward to the one you're working on now, theluthier.  If I have to steal a new computer, I am going to be ready when that thing drops!

    • crew

       I can't be like this in places where everyone is art competent can it?

      dostovel In my experience, no, it's not all suit-and-tie-soul-sucking-business throughout the creative field. Though I think every place needs some of that in order to sustain itself as a business, art-based entities are usually filled with art-loving people with passions similar to yours. This has been true of all my full-time jobs (small animation studio, large animation studio, CGC) and about half of my freelance jobs. It makes a big difference when you can geek out over a render or technique or new animation / game trailer with coworkers.

      It only makes sense that a bank wouldn't care about such things. The grass is greener elsewhere in this respect 👍

    • crew

      if it can be done while still leaving you guys headroom for continuing to make your awesome courses and other lessons - those are the bread and butter of CGC after all!

      jjakeblended No doubt, pre-recorded courses are our bread and butter here. I doubt that will ever change. So yes these collaborations would have to fit within our course production regimen. In theory instructors could leap frog tasks. Lets say Lampel and Wayne record a course while I run a collaborative project and when  finished we switch.

      One unfortunate aspect of the DOG project is that it did seem to lock out some of the more beginner-level and even some intermediate-level members

      This is true, unfortunately. One absolute truth about teaching Blender is how impossible it is to teach every skill level. We've beaten our brains to a pulp over the years trying to figure out the best way to teach both. I suppose the best way to accommodate all levels is to vary our aim with each collaboration, same as our courses. Sometimes it'll be advanced, like the DOG, and sometimes it'll be beginner-friendly.

      Regardless I always want to maintain an open door to all levels for all project. It'll take courage for beginners to participate in an advanced project and patience / empathy for an advanced member to participate in a beginner project. It'd be important to make that clear somehow.

      Speaking of courses though - yeah I am SERIOUSLY looking forward to the one you're working on now.  If I have to steal a new computer, I am going to be ready when that thing drops!

      I'm so glad to hear this! It's still a long ways off so you have plenty of time.

  • crew

    adrian2301 Apologies for commandeering your thread 😕

  • crew

    Apologies for commandeering your thread

    No need for apologies....

    It is all helpful information. 👍