Fundamentals of Texturing

Fundamentals of Texturing

Textures are 2D images that are designed to influence a 3D model’s appearance. Whether it’s simply to add color to a model like one would paint a clay sculpture, or to govern a specific material attribute, textures can be generated and painted by hand with Blender’s built-in tools.

Chapter 1 - Introduction

Get a birds-eye-view preface to the texturing process before diving in.

Chapter 2 - UV Coordinates

These are the 2D representation of a 3D model that exists mainly to transpose image textures on to the model.

Chapter 3 - Painting

Blender offers tools for hand-painting textures with digital "brushes".

Chapter 4 - Baking

Blender allows us to tranpose geometric information to image texture format in a process called "baking".

Chapter 5 - External Editing

Sometimes you need to use an external application to edit your textures. Here's how you can painless jump out of and back into Blender when texturing.

Chapter 6 - Application

Test your knowledge to prove you know a thing or two about texturing with Blender.

Textures are 2D images that are designed to influence a 3D model’s appearance. Whether it’s simply to add color to a model like one would paint a clay sculpture, or to govern a specific material attribute, textures can be generated and painted by hand with Blender’s built-in tools.

The texture process begins with addressing a model’s UV coordinates. UVs are the mechanism by which a 2D image is transposed on to a 3D model. It’s an art form in itself to layout these coordinates to maximize texel density (amount of texture pixels utilized) while minimizing stretching (disproportion between the model and its UV’s).

After UV’s are established, textures can be painted by hand using a Wacom pen and tablet. Textures can also be generated by “baking” geometric data into image texture format. Alternatively textures can be painted with an external application and easily brought back into Blender.

CC Music: “Home Tonight” by DoKashiteru

Lesson Questions and Answers

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  • Replies: 3

    i’m having a problem with my submission for the exercise, the texture doesn’t seem to want to show up on sketchfab. It comes out a fully chromed ax despite being textured in blender. I properly saved the textures to the blender file and if i open and close my .blendfile for the project, it opens with the ax textured in both blender render and cycles render. im not sure whats happening here.

    2 months ago

    • Replies: 0

      I’m having the same issue…any luck on finding an answer?

      2 months ago

    • Replies: 0

      Same thing. Am I missing something?

      1 month ago

    • Replies: 0

      I had the same problem. It took me a few hours to figure out how to submit with textures. To do so, just change to ‘Cycles Render’. Set views to ‘Node Editor’, ‘3D view’ and ‘UV/Image’ Editor. Also setup a ‘Properites’ and ‘Outliner’ menu. This is so you can edit your 2d images, apply the image to your model and see the 3d results all at once. Your goal is to be in ‘Object Mode’ in your 3d view and see your graphic applied to the model. Once there save your blend file and upload. This will upload the model with the drawn image. To get the image on the 3d model in object mode go to ‘Outliner’ and highlight your axe. With the axe highlighted go to ‘Properites’ and select ‘Material’ and then click the ‘+’ to add a new material for your axe. Now in ‘Node Editor’ create an ‘image texture’ node and use your png drawing for it, and connect the color link on the ‘image texture’ node to the surface link on the Material Output node. This should make your png texture visible on the axe model when the 3d model is in ‘Object mode’. Up until this point you likely could only see your png drawing on the 3d model when it was in Texture paint mode. I’m going by memory so I may have messed up a point or two but the gist is use ‘Cycles Render’, create a material for your 3d axe and in the node editor create an image texture and link it to material output for your 3d object, if it works you should see your png file applied to your 3d object when it is viewed in Object Mode. Save this object to a .blend file and then upload it and you will see the full upload in Sketchfab.

      2 weeks ago

  • Replies: 0

    One thing that threw me in the Texture Baking Cycles video was when the baking of the room was demoed around 3:35 seconds in the video. When Bake was hit it initially showed the image as bake_gizmo but then there was a fade in and it showed bake_room as the new image. There was no voice over to draw my attention to it. I figured it out after the room ended up baking like the gizmo. I went back, hit bake again and then changed the image output to bake_room. Then it rendered the room using the bake_room image and the gizmo as the bake_gizmo image.

    4 months ago

  • Replies: 1

    This course is very hard to follow. So far I don’t understand a thing. Too little information on the 2d painting and 3d – what is the difference, when it’s better to use one or other option? Instead of just applying different brushes, you could show how to use one or two to get some nice result. soo… everything is messed up for me.

    4 months ago

    • Replies: 4

      We intentionally decided that these fundamentals courses should not be project based, which is why I’m merely introducing you to the tools instead of showing you a nice result. For more project-based training, check out these courses:

      https://cgcookie.com/course/shading-fundamentals-in-blender-render/
      https://cgcookie.com/course/shading-the-sci-fi-helmet/

      4 months ago

      • Thank you for your answer sir Kent, yes this is what i did, after watching other courses coming back to this one now i understand it much better, thanks for those two you linked, i will definitely study them aswel.

        4 months ago

      • oops, replied to the wrong comment sorry

        4 months ago

      • I will check other courses of course, though they seem to be more difficult then the difficulty level of this one. Actually getting a nice result is not the point when it is clear when I should aply each instrument. In one of the videos you show texturing in Blender render then in Cycles and in the very end you switch to node editor – that was my boiling point when I understood that I understand nothing. Hope it will be more clear further.

        4 months ago

      • lapo4k@gmail.com i was in the same situation, i suggest you continue the next 2 fundamentals then come back to this one, it made much more sense to me

        4 months ago

  • Replies: 1

    This course is pretty hard compared to the last one, is there any newbie friendly ressources i could watch/read to better understand it?

    4 months ago

    • Replies: 1

      Could you help me understand why it’s harder to understand? Because this is the newbie-friendly resource..

      4 months ago

      • Disregard my question, i was very confused watching this one with no prior knowledge but coming back to it after watching other course makes much more sense, thanks.

        4 months ago

  • Replies: 0

    I am following the video on texturing the axe since I failed at figuring it out myself. I am at the stage of unwrapping the axe and moved one side over top of the other side over in the UV image editor. I then snap the vertices from on map onto the other map. Then I get to the last vertices where one vertex from one image is close to the other. When I try to select one vertex, both gets selected. How do I select just the one vertex so I can snap it onto the other vertex?

    4 months ago